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Essay/Term paper: 1984: government's attempt to control the mind and bodies of its citizens

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❶With this novel, Orwell also introduced the genre of the dystopic novel into the world of literature. While free essays can be traced by Turnitin plagiarism detection program , our custom written essays will pass any plagiarism test.

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1984 Essay
Essay, term paper, research paper: George Orwell
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Winston looks at the screen, where an announcer gladly informs everyone that Oceania has won the recent war, and he understands that he now loves the Big Brother. The system managed to break and completely remake Winston.

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Related Writing Guides There are two basic types of summaries: Later in the novel the government tries even more drastic methods of control. Big Brother's predictions in the Times are changed. The government is lying about production figures pages Even later in the novel, Syme's name was left out on the Chess Committee list. He then essentially vanishes as though he had never truly existed page Though the methods and activities of the government seem rather extreme in Orwell's novel, they may not be entirely too false.

In the novel, Winston Smith talks about the people not being human. He says that "the only thing that can keep you human is to not allow the government to get inside you. The corruption is not the only issue which Orwell presents, both directly and indirectly. He warns that absolute power in the hands of any government can lead to the deprival of basic freedoms and liberties for the people. Though he uses the Soviet Union as the basis of the novel's example, he sets the story in England to show that any absolute power, whether in a Communist state or a Democratic one, can result in an autocratic and overbearing rule.

When government lies become truths, and nobody will oppose, anything can simply become a fact. Through the control of the mind and body the government attempts, any hopes of achieving an utopian society are dashed. The peoples' minds are essentially not theirs' anymore. The government tells them how to think.

Conformity and this unilateral thinking throughout the entire population can have disastrous results. Orwell also tells us it has become a "world of monstrous machines and terrifying weapons. Warriors fighting, triumphing, persecuting George Orwell was born in India and brought up with the British upper class beliefs of superiority over the lower castes and in general class pride.

A theme very prevalent in his novels, Nineteen Eighty-Four certainly no exception, is this separation in the classes. The masses are disregarded by the Party. This is a theme which is "fundamental to the novel, but not demonstrated as fully as the devastation of language and the elimination of the past. Kazin also states in his essay that: Because he was from the upper middle class and knew from his own prejudices just how unreal the lower classes can be to upper-class radicals, a central theme in all his work is the separateness and loneliness of the upper-class observer, like his beloved Swift among the oppressed Irish.

This feeling of superiority somewhat provokes and leads to the aforementioned corruption of absolute power. As the saying goes, "absolute power corrupts absolutely. They, as Kazin stated, cannot comprehend the differentiation within the system, and thus become corrupt. This ultimately prevents achieving an utopian society where the upper class people want to oppress and the lower class want to rebel.

Orwell had strong anti-totalitarianism points of view and greatly satires Socialism, even though he still insisted he was a Socialist in its pure form, in this novel and in Animal Farm. It creates fear of obliterated privacy among citizens by alerting them that they are watched all the time.

The party uses this to make them believe that within the party nothing can go wrong, and without Big Brother they will not have such lives. Everyone thinks he is safe in Oceania because of the Big Brother, but they are in fact in danger, all the time.

No parties, no dates, no love, no citizens walk on street after curfew, laws are everywhere in Oceania. Although these are strictly implemented, they cannot be called laws theoretically because they are not written in a system.

There is no written laws in , there is no such thing as constitution or court, but that is exactly how fear is created, as citizens are always living in uncertainty. There is no law that defines thoughtcrime However, Winston could be arrested any time for committing thoughtcrime by even a tiny facial twitch suggesting struggle, and his nervous system literally becomes his biggest enemy.

Since there is no written law, the Party can change and adjust the strictness of laws freely as it wants, citizens never know if they have committed any crime, therefore no one is brave enough to defy the Party by any level, so fear is created.

Citizens then cannot have their own critical thinking, and only do what they are told to do, they work just as computers, which surprisingly only have two words. Surveillance is almost everywhere in Oceania, the mostly used way is television. There is a two-way screen, so-called television in every apartment and on street but they only serve the purpose of monitoring and propaganda, the Party gets simultaneous image of what its people are doing.

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Free papers, essays, and research papers. , by George Orwell and the USA Patriot Act - The novel, , written by George Orwell, gives readers an insight to a possible frightening future where one government has complete and definite control of the people.

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essays are academic essays for citation. These papers were written primarily by students and provide critical analysis of by George Orwell.

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Free Essay: George Orwell's War is Peace. Freedom is slavery. Ignorance is strength. These are the beliefs that the citizens of Oceania, in the novel. Essays and criticism on George Orwell's - Critical Essays.

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May 24,  · “No one is free, even the birds are chained to the sky.” Bob Dylan said this probably not knowing its profound connection with George Orwell’s novel “”, but the as well could be in “”. Orwell depicts a totalitarian dystopian world where there is no freedom and citizens are being brainwashed constantly. “” is a novel about totalitarianism and the fate of a single man who tried to escape from an overwhelming political regime. The book was written by the British writer and journalist George Orwell in and had the Soviet Union as a prototype of the social structure described in it. Events.